Firaaq Episode four

Lakeeron mein kismet ka haal chupa hota hai jo siraf dekhnay walay ko nazar aata hai... Yahan dekhnay walay bahut hain, dikhanay walay bahut kaam, or will have to I say wali.

So far as episodes go and I might even say tales, that is Firaaq's first hiccup. Regardless of development of narrative, I am stunned that no faster is Paiman out from her captivity that everybody round her needs to look her settled. Arrey let her are living her lifestyles, please and thanks! Imroze, who I've really extensive doubts about, is head over heels in mohabbat with Paiman. Rumi is as perplexed (one thing Noor Hassan is superb at portraying) as ever. Sara is matchmaking (and to assume I if truth be told favored Sara). Shams is gloating (to Maa-jee, who else?!). In point of fact?! What took place to consistency? To logical conclusions? To (dare I say it) sanity? Is that this the top of a just right collection? All we will get from you now's three "excellent" episodes, Hum TV?

Having stated that, I feel the explanation at the back of such fast revelations - one after the opposite - is (as I've said before) because Firaaq is a story of consequences and not actions. The quick narrative here allows Aabis Raza and Mustafa Afridi to dwell on what happens after these revelations. Mohabbat kay baad kya? Shaadi kay baad kya? Maa-je ka kya? Aur sabsay bada sawaal Paiman ka kya? It is these questions that (I believe) form the bulk of our story and I'm certain we will come back to them.

So essential is Paiman in this narrative that all plot lines emerge, revolve, and merge from, around, and into her. Is it any wonder, then, that everyone seems to be mandara-ooing around her?

Let's start with Imroze, a qualified psychologist or psychiatrist or jo bhi woh hai, who's fallen head over heels in love with our damsel in distress. Sadaf, my fellow reviewer, rightly brought up that perhaps, men need a victim, that they need someone to save. Is that why Imroze likes Paiman? From my point of view (nukta-e-nazar) and in my experience men, especially those settled in life at least professionally, prefer a partner that can complement them. As much as I see Paiman has been sheltered, and rather forcefully at that, from the world, seeing these two together as a couple is beyond me. How? Why? Moreover, no one falls in love in three episodes, this is not a Bollywood film! Hum TV get your act straight. Khirad and Ashar didn't fall in love until mid-series. Similarly, Kashaf and Zaroon couldn't stand each other before they were married and perhaps even after. To phir Paiman ko itni jaldi mohabbat kaisay ho gayee? Does she even know what mohabbat is? How do we know this charming doctor is not out to get into her shalwar only?

Which brings me to the whole "Do you trust me?" situation. Paiman, sweety, meri baat par gaur karo, jab koi mard kisi khatoon ko yeh lawaz kehta hai uskay do hi matlab hotay hai, pehla, ki woh aap ko dhooka dainay wala hai, aur doosra, ki woh aap ko dhoka day chukka hai. Of course, this is in relation to a particular kind of situation, i.e., between two lovers (or in this case would-be-lovers). Baaton mein yaad aaya, Paiman Bibi, aap ek qafas say nikal kar doosray qafas mein jaanay kay liye betaab kyun hai? Zara mujhe yeh samjhayeen?

This love game (I wish it was the Lady Gaga kind!) is yet to mark its third shikaar. Humara awaara and nikaara painter, Rumi, is being pushed to see similarities between Paiman and himself by Bhabhi Sara. Inasmuch as I find Sara to be hesitant about Imroze and his relationship with Paiman for her own reasons, I cannot help but think she's on to something. Both Shams and Sara have known Rumi for a long time, they all get along rather well, Rumi and Paiman share similar interests, he's immature enough to balance out her reserved and cautious ways, so, yes, I think Sara is right to suggest that these two should seriously think about the other. Noor Hassan's Rumi is an easy pill to swallow, his portrayal of carefree, no nakhara type of guy who's concerned how he'll manage to balance Paiman is wholly genuine. The fact that he's unconvinced even the second time around makes me think he just might have more depth than I previously thought.

Whether Hassan's Rumi can provide Paiman what she needs is another story altogether. After spending an eternity with Maa-jee, Rumi will be a gentle breeze who'll draw Paiman out from her shell in ways Imroze never will, but the sad thing is Paiman will never trust the painter as she does the shrink. So, for once, I'm going to agree with Maa-jee: "Pagaloon ka daktar" indeed. Mohib Mirza looks the part of a young professional (even with that rather odd shoe situation). He's confident, sauve, dapper, and sophisticated, adding a dimension to Imroze that no other actor could have. It doesn't hurt that he looks good with Sanam Saeed, and boy these two do look good together. His Imroze is (for the time being) the centre of attention.

As is evident, there is a certain hesitation around Imroze from all quarters - Shams because he's another man interested in his baby sister, Rumi because they're friends, Maa-jee... well Maa-jee hates everyone, and Sara for her own secretive reason. Its his profession that brought these individuals together and maybe it'll be the reason that breaks them up too.

Breaking up, though, brings me to Sara. If anyone is going to feel the repercussions of this relationship it is Sara. When I first reviewed Firaaq, I hated Cybil's accent, but as they say things grown on you and I've realized her accent isn't half as bad as Kanza's in Numm. Not to mention she can act! Cybil's Sara is always well put together, she seems and comes across as mature, and balances out Shams very well, which is why I think she wants Rumi to settle down with Paiman. Cybil's acting is not perfect but it isn't bad either. Accents, voice work, diction these are things time, experience, and classes can take care of, screen presence, maturity, the ability to fit a role are things that one can't buy as easily. Imagine if Meera was playing Paiman?

Oh the horror!

Horror brings me to Maa-jee. And boy was I disappointed to see just a snippet of her. What did I say last week: The only person who genuinely cares for Paiman is Haider and this week Shams made it very clear that his reasons were far from philanthropic. A beautifully shot scene which captures the essence of a rather fraught meeting (kudos DoP!) Shams intentions are rendered visible. My only concern is what will happen when Paiman falls? Who will pick her up? Kaun? Haider? Rumi? Shams? Maa-jee? Sara? Imroze? Kaun?

Here's hoping this is just one hiccup in a smooth meal.

Until next week,

Rab Rakha

RB (Tweet me!)

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